Twitter is going to ‘change forever.’ That is according to Pankaj Gupta (LinkedIn), who leads the platform’s Personalization and Recommender Systems group. While he said that the changes would be seen today he shared little information on the changes to Twitter’s search offering, which have been derided by users.

 

As a channel, Twitter’s strength lies in the data that it gathers from people worldwide, ranging from influential political leaders and journalists to the general public. Yet, while it’s deep integration with Apple’s iOS enabled it to grow as a platform it is yet to fully structure it’s database into a diary that allows people to register themselves by not just name, job and location, but subjects of interest.

Only during the last fortnight I have shown clients how to find individuals on Twitter that haven’t declared that they work for specific organisations. Anonymity is good, but authority is only built on the reputations that you have offline. Perhaps this might be a reason why Twitter has separated itself from LinkedIn. With the changes due to be announced soon, what changes would you want to see from Twitter?

UPDATE: Twitter have just announced on their blog the introduction of ‘search autocomplete’ and and ‘People you follow’ search results to twitter.com. In a post by Twitter Software Engineer Frost Li (LinkedIn), Twitter unveiled how after entering the search users will find ‘the the most relevant Tweets, articles, accounts, images and videos for your query.’

 

The move takes the platform in the right direction, enabling users to find content and conversations in real-time.  Auto complete will be available outside the US shortly.

Find out more in their blog post here.

The BBC launched its much-anticipated ‘Democracy Live’ online service on Friday. Offering ‘live and video on demand video coverage of the UK’s national political institutions and the European Parliament’, the site brings politics to the public. Giving people insight into government and how our elected representatives and institutions work.

It was two years ago when the corporation’s Director General Mark Thompson gave a speech at Westminster on trust, politics and broadcasting where he outlined his view on how the BBC could help make politics more relevant to every citizen in this country.

At the time Thomson said, “We want to take our coverage of Westminster, the Scottish Parliament, the Welsh Assembly, the Northern Ireland Assembly, the European Parliament, as well as local councils up and down the land and turn them into the most engaging, the most creative multimedia portal for democracy in the world, using BBC Parliament and our other television, networks, radio, the web and mobile. Since then MPs and news outlets have come under more scrutiny than ever before.

In his speech Thompson added, “Direct access to information about your MP or representative: how they vote, what they stand for, how you can contact them. Survival guides and in-depth analysis of current debates and current legislation. Easy ways, for anyone who wants to, to plug into and take part in the debate. And all of it available to every secondary school in the UK as part of a strengthened commitment by BBC Learning to supporting citizenship and modern media literacy.”

I understand that the BBC has invested between £1-£1.5 million on Democracy Live, with the most significant cost being the 11 members of staff focused on the site.

Up and until the launch accessing such information and real-time feeds were available through either the Parliament site or through paid-for services such as those offered by companies such as DeHavilland.

What will make Democracy Live work is the use of speech-to-text recognition software offered by Blinkx. It is understood that Blinkx will the use both the phonetic and text transcripts to create transcripts and meta-tags that can be added to each video.  Blinkx also has a speech to text success rate of over 80 per cent, which is expected to increase as the site and video services beds in.

I also gather that the beta’s of the site that were presented to politicians during conference season were well received.

So, politics through the BBC, scrutiny of politicians and their decision-making though the BBC.